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Tuesday, November 26, 2013

News and Other Stuff

BLACK FRIDAY GUN DEALS!

Get ready to save.  Or spend.  Or both.

And stay home and shop online.  You'll stay healthier that way.
Ol' Backwoods' Black Friday Black Rifle

Last year, Ol' Backwoods got an AR-15 upper at JSE Surplus on Black Friday for only $335.  Still runnin' great, over 1,500 rounds later.

Many who revere the right to keep and bear arms also are into preparedness, like yours truly.  Here's an article that will curl your hair: Americans are incredibly dependent on both government and systems of support.  But...

Only the Self-Reliant Remain Free

Who had more freedom? 
Was it the pioneer who rode horseback across the Midwest, settled in a wide-open space without paved roads, grocery stores or hospitals, and he had to build his own home, cultivate his own food and educate his own children? 
Or was it the less-adventuresome brother he left behind in an Eastern city who lived next door to a hospital, across the street from a public school and kitty corner from a grocery store -- but in his later years, he could only get to work if he rode a public transit line and if the transit line ran on time? 
I vote for the pioneer. He was not dependent on government. His brother was. 
Self-reliance and freedom are inseparable. Americans once knew this in their very souls. Now, coaxed by those with a socialistic vision of government, we are beginning to forget it. We are becoming ever more dependent on government and putting our freedom at risk.
Nice kitty!  And Melissa Bachman ain't bad either!
Remaining self-reliant means having a means to feed yourself without recourse to the grocery store. Hunting is one way to accomplish at least part of that. With all hue and cry over outdoorsy gal Melissa Bachman shooting one lion on an hunt in South Africa, it's time to set the record straight. It's the hunters that are preserving game and game habitats. Learn all about it here:

25 Reasons Why Hunting Is Conservation  

(via this Clash Daily article)
Reason No. 19 why Hunting Is Conservation: Hunting has major value for highway safety. For every deer hit by a motorist, hunters take six. 
Reason No. 20 why Hunting Is Conservation: Deer collisions kill 200 motorists and cost $10 billion a year. Imagine costs without hunting!
Genesis 9:3, people.

Speaking of beginnings, here's a journalist who has made a new start.  Michael Barone actually admits in the article linked below that he was WRONG about concealed carry causing blood to run in the streets.  Of course.  We told him so, but journalists never understand reality.  Most of them just emote their way through life.  Here's one that admits he is wrong.  That gets Ol' Backwoods' respect.  And it is music to my ears to hear that Americans are now overwhelmingly opposed to gun bans.

Why opposition to gun control has increased

Many, including me, predicted that this would lead to gunfights on the street and over traffic altercations. Those predictions have proved wrong. It turns out that ordinary citizens who can demonstrate that they know how to handle guns do so responsibly — just as they handle cars (potential weapons, after all) responsibly as well. 
Cops have no duty to protect the citizen, anyway.  We might as well take responsibility for ourselves.

And speaking of cops not protecting people...

The Police Are Not Your Friends, Part 35,403
JPFO.org - "Dial 911 & Die"


And this dude was just SUSPENDED in September for having sex with an 18-year-old girl who was in one of those "police explorer" programs for youth.  Yeah, that cop was "exploring" all right!  I hope he is jailed.

QUOTE OF THE DAY

If you ignore the adrenaline dumps and the blood pressure spikes this is a very, very good book.” – Joe Huffman on “Emily Gets her Gun.” More here.

And speaking of blood pressure spikes:

Bad managers ruined Obamacare

This passage warms me ol' engineer's heart:
What engineers know that lawyers and politicians often don't is that in the world of things, as opposed to people, there's no escaping the sharp teeth of reality. But in law, and especially politics, inconvenient facts are merely inconvenient, something to be rationalized away.
And now for something completely different...

COOL AVIATION HISTORY

Bill Weaver survived an in-flight breakup of an SR-71 at Mach 3.2 and 78,000 feet ASL
SR-71 Blackbird

I think the SR-71 represents the pinnacle of Western Civilization with regards to mechanical and aerospace engineering.  And that fateful flight happened 47 years ago.  I bet America couldn't even build an SR-71 today.  Kelly Johnson was a genius, as were all of those Lockheed Skunk Works guys.

And speaking of history, here's an article from back in the 80's, when the biggest gun ban of them all went down.   President Ronald Reagan signed the so-called "Firearms Owner's Protection Bill", that unbeknownst to Reagan (so I am told) contained a poison amendment by one William J. Hughes (D-NJ), with an assist from Charlie Rangel (D, NY), that banned forever the manufacture and transfer of full-auto weapons to those not in the military.  Or police.  Same thing.  A standing army the Founders would have hated.  Anyway...

From 1986: Reagan's Shame, or, $1600 Ain't That Much for an M-16

[Okay, that's my title.  Here's the real one. -- BWE]
Machine Guns Going Out With A Bang
June 9, 1986|By Michael Lasalandra, Staff Writer 
[South Florida Sun-Sentinel] 
Law-abiding citizens who want to play Rambo [what crap -- BWE] with their very own submachine guns are finding the weapons more expensive and harder to locate since President Reagan signed a new gun law banning the manufacture of automatic weapons for public sale. 
Weapons manufacturers turned out record numbers of machine guns just before the May 19 signing of the new law, and they are being snapped up by dealers as quickly as they can be shipped, according to officials of the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.



But because there will be no more to be had by the general public after these are sold, dealers already are charging record prices for the weapons. 
"The guns on the street that were worth $900 are worth $1,800 today. They've doubled in price because you can`t get them anymore," said Ted McLeod, owner of Trail Guns Inc. on South Military Trail in West Palm Beach.   
[Today, M-16's are upwards of $20,000.  If you can find one that was made before 5/19/86 that you can convince someone to transfer to you.  If you're willing to wait the 6-12 months for ATF to complete the transfer.  After you fill out 14 copies of the paperwork, and provide fingerprints for each copy.  --BWE]
Some dealers across the country report that a Thompson submachine gun that used to retail for about $1,095 now sells for $1,695. 
And people are paying the price, dealers said, because they fear the day will come when there won`t be any machine guns available to them. 
"There`s been an awful lot of people purchasing weapons in the past month," said the owner of Frankford Arsenal in Oakland Park, who requested anonymity. "Mostly machine guns. I just sold my last one. People are absolutely reacting to the bill that was signed. Some of these people wouldn't normally buy a machine gun, but they are buying them now." 
McLeod said the law has increased the demand for semi-automatic weapons and cited the fact that he sold four Uzis last week, whereas normally he sells one a month. 
Tom Hill, an ATF agent in Washington, said the bureau normally receives 50 to 100 applications per day to register automatic weapons, such as machine guns, sawed-off shotguns and silencers. "Before May 19, it had jumped to about 1,000 per day," he said.
However, Hill said that "about 95 percent of those were from manufacturers, not average Joes."
As of May 20, there were 127,215 registered machine guns nationwide. Texas led the country with 12,410, followed by California with 8,642. Georgia and Florida were vying for the third spot, with Georgia having 7,245 registered machine guns to Florida`s 7,229. 
While there are 507 weapons dealers registered in Palm Beach County alone, according to bureau statistics, only 256 statewide hold class three licenses, which allow them to sell automatic weapons. The names of those license holders are protected by federal law since they are holders of special tax stamps issued by the Internal Revenue Service.  [Special Occupational Taxpayers -- BWE]
Prospective buyers must have the approval of their local law enforcement chief, have their fingerprints and photograph taken, and allow the FBI to check their record in order to obtain a machine gun license, which costs $200 per weapon.
 That's all for today, my friends.  Give Ol' Backwoods an earful in the comments below.

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